Posts Tagged ‘Chip Yates’

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TTXGP on The Rules and SWIGZ

November 11, 2010

I recently asked Azhar Hussain, CEO of TTXGP about a recent dust-up involving the 2011 rules (which should be out any day now) and a claim by one of the teams which had planned to participate in 2011, that it would be excluded from the races because of a new weight limit.  (More on the specifics of the weights, the rules, and the claims, later).

TTXGP responded with this message:

TTXGP are very surprised and disappointed to learn via twitter that Swigz are choosing not to join TTXGP in 2011.

TTXGP 2011 will consist of two classes: Formula GP (maximum weight: 250kg) and Formula 75 (maximum weight: 200kg + 7.5kWh limit). The race length is 20miles. wiki.egrandprix.com was a key channel for rule deliberation. The rule book is open sourced, Harry Mallin of eMotoRules was involved in pulling together the suggested changes for rules of TTXGP 2011. They were then peer reviewed by the independent technical committee from the IET.

TTXGP is not a one man, one company show. Be Part of it is more than a tagline.

It was apparent over the 2010 season that a single class could not meet the best interests of the teams, fans or sponsors. The field was too wide. In this case TTXGP consulted widely, acted responsibly, in the best interest of the sport, community and majority of teams.

The economics of running a racing series means that classes have to be connected to number of entries. Our concern was to create classes that will have the highest number of entries and give the participants a level playing field. We are by nature committed to removing limits where possible.

TTXGP launched the Electric Motorcycle Motorsports in the world stage in 2009. In that time we, as an industry, have learnt a great deal that could move forward the progress and innovation. A key motivating factor for us and the current teams is to build vehicles that have real world applicability. Driving down mass for higher speed leads to higher efficiency and better design and fits in with the goals of the teams and the series.

To date, the rule changes have had a positive response and the teams are encouraged that we have created some sensible classes that will grow the field. Racing needs to both push and constrain to create real world innovation and a thrilling spectacle, in this case we are satisfied that we have struck the right balance for the greater good.

Using the conflict of interest with respect to Mavizen is a moot point. Mavizen exists purely to provide technical support, spare parts, expertise and on occasion, complete platforms to those that need it. No team is required to use Mavizen, though over the year, it has proved crucial to many.

In addition to the class changes, 2011 will also see solutions for logistics and a focused effort to promote the TTXGP teams across the world.

We wish Swigz well in whatever they decide to do.

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Real World Implications for TTXGP Rules

May 5, 2010

MoTec Advanced Central Logger

Discussions on the Talk pages of the TTXGP Technical Rules Wiki have recently touched on the subject of transmission of information from the team to the bike and from the bike to the team.

A new rule was added that imposes a €10,000 fine on any team transmitting information to its bike.  This rule may be a bit of bait, drawing in an outraged Wiki editor to change it, but it has remained live and unedited since it was drafted, on April 26, 2010.

Perhaps people who read that rule determined that it was so conceptual that it would not become relevant for many years.

According to a recent article on Plugbike.com, however, at least one of the TTXGP North American teams is pushing the envelope on the application of this rule.  According to the article:

The MoTeC Advanced Central Logger (ACL) can store data from the race and also allow the rider to switch between multiple power maps to tune power delivery and KERS / regenerative braking on the fly.

Obviously this technology will grant the SWIGZ team an advantage over other bikes if track conditions change during a race. If it starts raining, Chip can switch to a a less aggressive power delivery map. Or, if his tires start to fade, he might want to do the same. Chip explains that this removes concerns from the rider’s mind and will lead to fewer mistakes.

That all sounds amazing but here is the kicker: As Chip exits the apex of a corner he can wack the throttle open and the ACL will analyze lean angle of the bike, depth of discharge of the battery pack, time left in the race, effectiveness of KERS and any other factors and put down the right amount of power for optimal acceleration.

While this advanced technology is currently controlled by the rider, it is a short, conceptual hop to having such a device controlled by the team, who may have a better idea than the rider about what current threats exist in the drive to win the race.

Will race scrutineers be able to recognize devices that have a potential to violate the rules?  Given that the Technical Advisory Panel is comprised of some of the leading experts in their fields of electrical and mechanical engineering, it would be a dangerous gamble to play in the minutes leading up to the race.  OR… someone could go on to the wiki and discuss the need to delete this portion of the rule and proceed with doing away with it.

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